Specifically because I live in a hot climate, I’m always fighting the feeling of being suspicious of anybody I pass in the streets with a hoodie pulled up. I feel guilty because of racial profiling associated with hoodies, but gotta protect myself and my family, especially because in many cases the perpetrators of assault and murder seen in media are somebody with a hood and/or mask on.

  • @czech@lemm.ee
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    513 months ago

    I wear a hoodie most of the time. I don’t mind if you feel suspicious of me; one reason I have a hood up is because I don’t want to engage with random people. Sounds like you would go out of your way to avoid me so mission accomplished.

  • Digital Mark
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    433 months ago

    Of course not. I am the guy in long coat, hoodie or toque, big black boots, and face mask.

    Crime rates have dropped massively, you’re being driven into a panic by pro-police, racist media manipulation.

    • @venusaur@lemmy.worldOP
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      23 months ago

      crime rates going down doesn’t mean it’s not still happening way more than it should. not sure where you live, but i’m in a big city and you definitely shouldn’t walk around thinking everything is peachy all the time.

      you can be vigilant with your own safety without being pro-police. the reality is that some criminals in the streets have a common uniform that non-criminals commonly wear.

      if i’m walking behind a woman by herself on an empty street, i’m gonna cross the street because i understand that they’re concerned for their safety, and i know women appreciate that.

      since crime has dropped, should women not be concerned for their safety? are they being manipulated by sexist media and driven into a panic if they are?

      • @octopus_ink@lemmy.ml
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        43 months ago

        Wow you really flipped that around, and even ended with a strawman. How are we talking about women and not hoodies?

        You shouldn’t feel bad for being suspicious of someone in a hoodie, but you should realize you are buying into pro-police, racist media manipulation exactly as the other person said.

        When you can find statistics showing crimes by people in hoodies are as common a problem as rape and sexual assault against women, then we can talk.

        the reality is that some criminals in the streets have a common uniform that non-criminals commonly wear.

        Wait until you hear how many criminals wear jeans.

          • @octopus_ink@lemmy.ml
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            23 months ago

            So I looked at your link.

            The article seems to be about the fact that it’s racially charged, and that people reporting it may be doing so out of racism

            But in the year following Martin’s death, **the number of crimes reported with “Suspect wore hood/hoodie” skyrocketed. In 2013, there were 1,243 reports, a 92% increase from 2012. **

            While this was the largest jump since 2010 (when the data became publicly available), the data show the number of suspects being labeled as wearing hoods or hoodies rising each year.

            This year, in the first six months, there were 2,510 crimes with “Suspect wore hood/hoodie,” a 29.5% increase from the first six months of 2018, which had 1,938 reported crimes.

            How do you read the first quoted bit, then uncritically present the rest of the numbers as being in support of your suspicion??

            • @venusaur@lemmy.worldOP
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              13 months ago

              You missed my point that despite caps/hats being the next largest attire being reported, I don’t feel guilty being suspicious of it. I feel guilty about being suspicious of hoodies because I’m aware of racism. I am not suspicious of hoodies because of racism.

              You’re incorrectly assuming I’m only suspicious of people in hoodies.

          • @octopus_ink@lemmy.ml
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            3 months ago

            When you can find statistics showing crimes by people in hoodies are as common a problem as rape and sexual assault against women, then we can talk.

            I don’t think that pie chart shows that. Not percentages. Numbers of crimes.

            Because if the stipulation is that it’s just as reasonable for you to worry about hoodies as for a woman to worry about a strange man behind her (which is the only way the prior comment would have been relevant) I continue to hard disagree.

            I’m equally suspicious about sunglasses and dark caps, but there’s no guilt there because we haven’t historically racially profiled people wearing that.

            So then, you are already acknowledging that your reaction is from pro-police racist tropes. Where is the argument between you and I?

            • @venusaur@lemmy.worldOP
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              13 months ago

              let’s take it all the way back. you said i shouldn’t be concerned because crime rates are down. i say that doesn’t mean i shouldn’t be concerned. it’s all relative. i think it’s still too high where i’m from and there are a number of “uniforms” that criminals wear, including hoodies. i am conflicted about being suspicious about hoodies because of racial profiling. i am not concerned about being suspicious of a person in a trench coat because there is no racist past.

              we each have our own tolerance for risk regarding our safety, and not sure if you’re a parent, but that tolerance for risk goes way down when you are protecting loved ones. you have a fair point about crime rates going down, but it’s dangerous to lower your guard because rates have gone down a little.

              • @octopus_ink@lemmy.ml
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                13 months ago

                you said i shouldn’t be concerned because crime rates are down.

                I don’t think I said this.

                Overall my point is just - we all have our biases. If you feel guilty about being suspicious about folks in a black hoodie, and if bias against hoodies is likely to be of racist origin, your guilt is some portion of you being aware of that. If you weren’t, we wouldn’t be having this discussion.

                It’s OK to admit that, even if only to yourself. I don’t think you should feel guilty about it. But I do think you should acknowledge what’s contributing to that bias. We all have that in some way or another, and I don’t think you can move past it while denying it’s there.

                • @venusaur@lemmy.worldOP
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                  3 months ago

                  I get what you’re saying, but in this case it’s the opposite. I’ll lay it out again.

                  There are multiple articles of clothing that are suspicious to me regardless of who is wearing them and how police treat people wearing them.

                  Hoodies are included amongst them.

                  Due to racial profiling of POC’s wearing hoodies, I feel guilty being suspicious of people in hoodies.

                  I’m also suspicious of people in trench coats, but we don’t racially profile people in trench coats like we do with people in hoodies, so I don’t feel guilty about it.

                  It could be anybody in a dark hoodie with the hood up that makes me suspicious, but if they’re a POC, I feel guilty because of police racially profiling people wearing them.

                  Does that make sense?

          • Luke
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            13 months ago

            Just pointing out how ironic it is that your response to someone informing you that you are being manipulated by police propaganda is to… go find stats sourced from the police to argue that you feel justified agreeing with the police propaganda.

            🤔

            • @venusaur@lemmy.worldOP
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              13 months ago

              That’s actually not what happened. I brought up stats that showed that police also report suspects in caps/hats, but I don’t feel guilty about that.

    • @Omega_Haxors@lemmy.ml
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      3 months ago

      They’re lying about crime rates so that they can pump more money into the police for when the people revolt.

      As a mastodon thread amazingly put it: The police are their climate plan. The police are their housing plan. The police are their food plan. Capitalists don’t want to fix the problem, they want to silence anyone who brings it up and kill anyone who takes direct action.

  • prole
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    3 months ago

    I think you can be aware or possibly even “wary” if you see that, but I think it is a little absurd to let that become actual worry or suspicion.

    Just be aware of your surroundings. Clock the person in a hoodie, make a mental note of it, and continue on your way. I feel like this is “how to live in a modern city 101.” If you get this thrown by seeing someone in a hoodie, then maybe you’re too anxious to be around that many people

  • AdaMA
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    163 months ago

    So, I was given some advice for situations like this that changed my life.

    The first thing that comes to mind in these moments isn’t what matters. It’s what a life time of indoctrinated racism/classism/sexism etc looks like. The thing that comes to mind here isn’t necessarily what you think, it’s what you’ve been taught to think,

    What matters is what you do next, after the thought has popped in to your mind.

    I was raised in a very racist environment, and I struggled with feeling guilt every time some racist thought I’d been trained with popped in to my head, because that’s not the person I want to be. Reframing it like this allowed me to stop getting hung up on the guilt part, and work on the part that actually means something

    • @MrsDoyle@lemmy.world
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      193 months ago

      One time I was walking through a city centre after midnight after drinks with friends - who told me to get a taxi because it’s so dangerous. I got to a pedestrianised street and there at the orher end was a group of tough-looking POC in hoodies. Uh oh. There seemed to be an argument in progress. Uh oh. I carried on though, to avoid a long detour. As I got nearer I caught the drift of the argument. “We’re only telling you this because we love you, mate.” Muffled sobbing. “Yeah, we worry about you! We want you to be happy!” It was teens in the midst of a full-on psychodrama, actually quite wholesome. I carried on home, berating myself for racial profiling. For a non-event it had quite a profound effect on my thinking.

      • prole
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        3 months ago

        And these are the kinds of interactions that people have in cities that terrify conservatives. Not the situation you described (although they’d be scared of that too), but the lesson you took away from it.

        Just being around people that look, sound, behave, have customs, etc., different than you changes the way you view the world in fundamental ways. You may not even realize it is happening.

        And most importantly, it makes everyone less afraid of one another. And this is how conservatives lose their power.

    • @venusaur@lemmy.worldOP
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      43 months ago

      Well what I do next is keep them in my line of sight and avoid them. I’m not suspicious of their race, I’m suspicious of their clothes. If they happen to be a POC though, there is more guilt involved.

      • AdaMA
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        13 months ago

        It’s what a life time of indoctrinated racism/classism/sexism etc looks

        • @venusaur@lemmy.worldOP
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          13 months ago

          I’m not only suspicious of hoodies. I understand where you’re coming from but I’m not suspicious of somebody in a hoodie because of race. It’s because I’ve seen a lot of people committing crimes in them. I’m also suspicious of people in black caps and sunglasses, but that’s not called racism/classism/sexism because celebrities wear that all the time.

  • Snot Flickerman
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    3 months ago

    I have cancer and I still wear a face mask everywhere due to a compromised immune system.

    I also get very cold with my disease/medications. My blood circulation isn’t as good now. I can be chilled when its 77 in a room without a sweatshirt. My hoodies aren’t black but they are dark blues and greens.

    Further, I have serious skin issues and always have that lead me to keep my hair always cropped very, very short. Meaning when I am chilled like that, I often have the hood up.

    I am not here to make judgment on your position but rather just a reminder of valid reasons things like this might happen that don’t involve others meaning you bodily harm.

    I am a big guy, and sometimes it feels a little tiring to have the default be everyone is scared of me despite my inability to defend myself before I had cancer. I don’t own guns or knives and my backpack is either full of groceries or PC maintenance equipment.

    • @venusaur@lemmy.worldOP
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      33 months ago

      sorry about your health. i wish the best for you.

      not nearly the same at all, but sometimes if i think i’m making somebody nervous (e.g. it’s late at night and i’m walking behind them) i’ll do this sort of public theatre where i’ll start humming and walking with a bounce in my step or something like that so they know where i’m at and to kind of give off a friendly vibe. that or i cross the street if i can.

      I can imagine it’s exhausting if people are suspicious of you all the time. the people wearing the clothes to the commit crimes mess it up for people on both sides. ski masks for example haha. if you’re wearing a ski mask in public and it’s not freezing outside, or even if it is, that’s so sus.